How to Run for Office: Developing Good Digital Content

How do we define “good content”?

Reading Time: 2 minutes

If you’ve taken the NDTC Digital course (online or live), you know we encourage candidates to focus when it comes to creating a social media presence for their campaigns.

Do one, do it well.

For most people, that means have a presence on Facebook.

With all the changes Facebook has been making, it’s only natural that many people are nervous about what that means for their campaigns.

Good content, is good content, is good content.

But what makes it good?

Good content is mixed

No one is going to engage with your Facebook page if they’re bored. You’ll lose followers if your posts are always a request to do something (donate, volunteer, etc).

You want to have a solid mix of content.

You should ideally be posting three kinds of content: informational, entertaining, and actionable.

Good content starts conversations

You may have a stance that seems to resonate with people, but do you know why? When you post an article about an issue that’s important to you, use that as an opportunity to ask your supporters how they feel. This tactic can be extremely helpful if you’re running in a red district and will need support from across the aisle. You will probably find topics that everyone in your community can agree on.

Good content does not include clickbait

You’ll NEVER believe what we did this weekend! Unless the answer to that is something truly unbelievable, you committed a cardinal sin of social media — a clickbait headline.

If you hype things up, you’d better deliver. Otherwise, you lose all credibility with your supporters.

Good content is snackable

We have a super short attention span these days. You’ve got to grab folks’ attention and get them to understand your content in 7 seconds.

1–2–3–4–5–6–7

That’s all you get.

When you’re drafting posts (or emails), have you given too much information?

Did you bury the point in a sea of details?

Good content is shareable

Once folks read your content, you want them to share it.

You want your supporters telling their friends why they’re supporting you.

If you’re posting content that people don’t share (ie don’t want to be seen or associated with), why are you posting it?

Good content creates a community

You are building a team. You’re doing this together.

You’re asking people to give you their time, money, and vote.

If you find yourself overusing the “I” key, it’s time to rethink your approach.

Now go be social!

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